INCOMES IN SOUTH DAKOTA

  • Matching historic trends, South Dakota's median household income in 2016 of $$54,567 remained below the nationwide median $57,617. But the gap was much smaller than before the Great Recession. In 1999, South Dakota's median income of about $50,000 compared to about $60,000 nationally. 

  • Lincoln County ranks No. 1 among South Dakota's 66 counties, with a median household income of $84,610 in 2016, while Buffalo County ranks 66th, at $22,500.

  • Nearly 111,000 South Dakotans lived in poverty in 2016, accounting for 13.3% of the state's population. That's an increase from about 107,000 in poverty in 2012.

  • More than 35,000 of those in poverty in 2016 were children under age 18, while over 14,000 were senior citizens. The remaining 61,182 were adults between the ages of 18 and 64. 

How much income a family needs to have a living wage in the Black Hills varies widely by circumstance, and a new living wage calculator from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology breaks down several situations in easy-to-read tables.

Exact numbers vary by county, but a family of four - two adults and two children - needs about $36,000 per year for a living wage.

Housing, food and transportation typically make up the top three categories for expenses, with the cost of adequate housing ranging widely from a single adult to a family with two or three children. Child care also can be among the top three expense categories for single parents.

The tables include numbers for a living wage plus figures for a poverty wage, and most often even that exceeds the minimum wage of $7.25 per hour.

Below are some highlights of the data for counties in the Black Hills region. Follow the links to see complete tables.

Pennington County

Single adult - Needs $16,551 annually/$7.96 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $498, food at $242 and transporation at $306.

Single parent with two children - Needs $43,801 annually/$21.06 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $732, food at $536 and transporation at $686.

Couple with three children -  Needs $43,185 annually/$20.76 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $969, food at $906 and transporation at $748.

Meade County

Single adult - Needs $14,418 annually/$6.93 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $353, food at $242 and transporation at $306.

Single parent with two children - Needs $41,039 annually/$19.73 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $546, food at $536 and transporation at $686.

Couple with three children -  Needs $40,612 annually/$19.52 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $794, food at $904 and transporation at $748.

Lawrence County

Single adult - Needs $14,800 annually/$7.12 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $379 food at $242 and transporation at $306.

Single parent with two children - Needs $41,336 annually/$19.87 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $566, food at $536 and transporation at $686.

Couple with three children -  Needs $40,524 annually/$19.48 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $788, food at $904 and transporation at $748.

Butte County

Single adult - Needs $15,168 annually/$7.29 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $404 food at $242 and transporation at $306.

Single parent with two children - Needs $40,890 annually/$19.66 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $536, food at $536 and transporation at $686.

Couple with three children -  Needs $39,480 annually/$18.98 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $717, food at $904 and transporation at $748.

Custer County

Single adult - Needs $15,168 annually/$7.29 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $404 food at $242 and transporation at $306.

Single parent with two children - Needs $40,890 annually/$19.66 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $717, food at $749 and transporation at $686.

Couple with three children -  Needs $39,480 annually/$18.98 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $717, food at $904 and transporation at $748.

Fall River County

Single adult - Needs $15,050 annually/$7.24 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $396 food at $242 and transporation at $306.

Single parent with two children - Needs $40,994 annually/$19.71 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $543, food at $536 and transporation at $686.

Couple with three children -  Needs $39,289 annually/$18.89 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $704, food at $904 and transporation at $748.

Shannon County

Single adult - Needs $15,168 annually/$7.29 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $404 food at $242 and transporation at $306.

Single parent with two children - Needs $40,890 annually/$19.66 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $536, food at $536 and transporation at $736.

Couple with three children -  Needs $39,480 annually/$18.98 hourly, with monthly expenses for housing at $717, food at $904 and transporation at $748.

 

Published in Dashboard newsfeed
Monday, 04 February 2013 00:00

Median Income

South Dakota Median Household Incomes Show Slight Growth in 2017

Following the national trend, South Dakotans’ median household income in 2017 rose for the fourth consecutive year to $56,521. Median household income in the state still remains below the national median of $60,336, however.

Though South Dakota’s 2017 median household income was the highest it’s been in the past two decades, it still reflects stagnation. Adjusted for inflation, median household income has hovered around $50,000 since 2006.

The Rushmore State remained the state with the 29th highest median household income in the country. Regionally, South Dakota ranks ahead of Montana, which posted a median income of $50,027, but is more than $10,000 behind Minnesota, at $65,599. Minnesota ranks 13th nationally, behind No. 1 Maryland at $78,945. Mississippi posted the lowest median household income in the country at $41,754. 

Following the national trend, South Dakotans’ median household income in 2017 rose for the fourth consecutive year to $56,521. Median household income in the state still remains below the national median of $60,336, however.

Though South Dakota’s 2017 median household income was the highest it’s been in the past two decades, it still reflects stagnation. Adjusted for inflation, median household income has hovered around $50,000 since 2006.

The Rushmore State remained the state with the 29th highest median household income in the country. Regionally, South Dakota ranks ahead of Montana, which posted a median income of $50,027, but is more than $10,000 behind Minnesota, at $65,599. Minnesota ranks 13th nationally, behind No. 1 Maryland at $78,945. Mississippi posted the lowest median household income in the country at $41,754. Here's a look at South Dakota and its neighboring states:

Published in Incomes
Wednesday, 16 January 2013 00:00

Poverty

Poverty Rates Continue Downward Trend Statewide, Disparities Remain

Poverty rates across South Dakota and the nation have declined slightly from 2016. According to the latest Census data, the national poverty rate in 2017 was 13.4%. The poverty rate in South Dakota was 12.8%. Disparities, particularly for those with disabilities, lower levels of education, and single women with children remain prevalent.

Regionally, South Dakota had the highest poverty rate but gained one place nationally to No. 26 in 2017 from No. 27 in 2016. Minnesota had the lowest poverty rate in the region at 9.5% while Montana—which placed last in the region in 2015—remained at No. 25 in the nation. A review of poverty in the states around South Dakota can be viewed below:

Single women with children were more than twice as likely to live in poverty in 2017 than any other household group. In 2017, 38.2% of single mothers lived in poverty, up 0.1% from 2016, but significantly higher than 34.3% in 2015. By comparison, 17.2% of nonfamily households lived in poverty while 17.1% of single men with children lived below the poverty line.

Women were also more likely to live in poverty than men, at 14.0% in 2017 compared to 14.6% in 2016. The number of men who lived in poverty was 12.0%, up from 11.6%, in 2016.

Published in Incomes
Tuesday, 04 December 2012 00:00

More Households Cost-Burdened Since Recession

A study by the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University points out that in the wake of the collapse of the housing bubble in 2008, the national rate of homeownership has fallen and the percentage of Americans who are renters has increased.

The Harvard study focused on cities with more than 100,000 people, so the Rapid City metropolitan area (which includes Pennington, Meade, and Custer counties) did not make the list. The South Dakota Dashboard has the relevant data, so we looked at how our region would have fared if we had been included.

Homeownership Versus Renting

In the United States, the rate of homeownership has declined from its peak of 67.3 percent in 2004 to 63.5 percent in 2013. This means nearly 42 million households across the country are renters. In South Dakota, homeownership suffered a more modest decline. From a peak of 69.2 percent in 2006, homeownership fell to 67.2 percent in 2013. The decline was far greater in the Rapid City Metro area falling from a peak of 71.7 percent in 2006 to 65.8 percent in 2012, though it has increased to 68.1 percent in 2013. Sioux Falls also saw a decline (from 69.7 percent in 2006 to 64.6 percent in 2012), although it, too, has increased to 68 percent in 2013.

Unlike the rest of the nation, Rapid City has seen a significant decrease in the share of cost-burdened households since the peak of the recession. In 2008, 34.9 percent of households in the Rapid City metro area were paying 30 percent or more of their income for monthly housing costs. In 2012, that rate fell to 27.1 percent, though it has increased to 31.1 percent in 2013. Sioux Falls shows similar trends with percent of cost-burden housing peaking in 2009 at 28.3 percent but has decreased to 22.4 percent in 2013.

The Harvard study also looked at trends in rental prices in relationship to median household incomes. Nationally, they found that while real median rents increased 6 percent between 2000 and 2012, real median incomes for renters fell 13 percent. In the United States in 2012, according to statistician Ben Engebreth, the median annual rent as a percentage of median household income was about 20.7 percent. In the Rapid City metro area, where the median annual rent was $9,372 (or $781 per month), the ratio of median rent to median income was 18.6 percent in 2012, lower than the nation, but higher than the statewide rate of nearly 16.2 percent.

Governing magazine provides an interactive tool that allows the user to see how cities rank in terms of housing cost burden. According to this tool, Sioux Falls, with a rent-to-income ratio of 27.3 percent ranked 282nd among 302 cities in terms of housing cost burden, making it one of the most affordable major cities in the country for rental housing. If Rapid City had been included in this chart, with its 18.6 percent ratio, it would have beaten all other cities on the list.

To view more statistics on homeownership rates visit the Housing Cost Burden page on the South Dakota Dashboard.

 

Published in South Dakota Dashboard
Page 6 of 6

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